IRC Sec. 1031

Like-Kind Exchanges Under IRC Code Section 1031 - From https://www.IRS.gov

FS-2008-18, February 2008


WASHINGTON — Whenever you sell business or investment property and you have a gain, you generally have to pay tax on the gain at the time of sale. IRC Section 1031 provides an exception and allows you to postpone paying tax on the gain if you reinvest the proceeds in similar property as part of a qualifying like-kind exchange. Gain deferred in a like-kind exchange under IRC Section 1031 is tax-deferred, but it is not tax-free.


The exchange can include like-kind property exclusively or it can include like-kind property along with cash, liabilities and property that are not like-kind. If you receive cash, relief from debt, or property that is not like-kind, however, you may trigger some taxable gain in the year of the exchange. There can be both deferred and recognized gain in the same transaction when a taxpayer exchanges for like-kind property of lesser value.


This fact sheet, the 21st in the Tax Gap series, provides additional guidance to taxpayers regarding the rules and regulations governing deferred like-kind exchanges.


Who qualifies for the Section 1031 exchange?


Owners of investment and business property may qualify for a Section 1031 deferral. Individuals, C corporations, S corporations, partnerships (general or limited), limited liability companies, trusts and any other taxpaying entity may set up an exchange of business or investment properties for business or investment properties under Section 1031.


What are the different structures of a Section 1031 Exchange?


To accomplish a Section 1031 exchange, there must be an exchange of properties.  The simplest type of Section 1031 exchange is a simultaneous swap of one property for another. 


Deferred exchanges are more complex but allow flexibility.  They allow you to dispose of property and subsequently acquire one or more other like-kind replacement properties. 


To qualify as a Section 1031 exchange, a deferred exchange must be distinguished from the case of a taxpayer simply selling one property and using the proceeds to purchase another property (which is a taxable transaction).  Rather, in a deferred exchange, the disposition of the relinquished property and acquisition of the replacement property must be mutually dependent parts of an integrated transaction constituting an exchange of property.  Taxpayers engaging in deferred exchanges generally use exchange facilitators under exchange agreements pursuant to rules provided in the Income Tax Regulations.




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